Winter Solo

I prefer to go by myself- to use porters or oxygen is cheating
The Day Everest Shook

At the 25th of April 2015 the earthquake in Nepal changed my life
Far From Civilization

The way to the mountains of this world is also a way into myself
Share The Vision

One of the reasons I climb is to encourage and inspire
Everyday is an adventure and through this
- worth living
Annapurna 8091m Solo Expedition
Only who dares to start

will discover "new land"
Winter Solo
I prefer to go by myself-
to use porters or oxygen is cheating
The Day Everest Shook
At the 25th of April 2015 the earthquake in Nepal changed my life
Far From Civilization
The way to the mountains of this world is also a way into myself
Share The Vision
One of the reasons
I climb is to encourage and inspire
Everyday is an adventure
and through this - worth living
Annapurna 8091m Solo Expedition
Only who dares to start

will discover "new land"
Winter
Solo
I prefer to go by myself- to use porters or oxygen is cheating
The Day Everest Shook
At the 25th of April 2015 the earthquake in Nepal changed my life
Far From
Civilization
The way to the mountains of this world is also a way into myself
Share
The Vision
One of the reasons I climb is to encourage and inspire
Everyday is an adventure
and through this - worth living
Annapurna 8091m Solo Expedition
Only who
dares
to start
will discover "new land"

On the 3rd of Oktober at 10.25am I reached the summit of Nangpai Gosum II 7296m solo.

Nangpai Gosum was considered as the 4th highest unclimbed mountain in the world. It has been tried before by a team of French mountain guides but without success due to dry conditions and frequent rock fall.

On the 12.08.17 I left from Germany to Nepal and arrived in basecamp after acclimatization at the 05.09.17 to try a solo on this technical route. Over the next few weeks I carried my loads (including 500m of ropes) to the mountain. The idea was to fix these ropes in the very technical passages so that they only had to be soloed once and would allow a quick descent in case of bad weather or injuries. At the 25.09.2017 I tried to establish camp2 where the french team had bivouacked on the highest point they reached at about 6600m.

One of the problems with this route is that it's a south face once the sun is up the ice is melting quickly and exposes the granite which makes climbing difficult and sends a bombardment of rocks. on the other hand if it's snowing you have avalanches crashing down the route regularly. On the way up I soloed an 80 degrees Ice wall at about 6300m altitude as I faced very dry conditions on the upper end that turned out to be a bottleneck. The only way to continue was to pass this way but the ice was very thin and fragile and ended on blank stone. To get an overview and hang my backpack I build up a belay based on my two ice axes and an ice screw connected to a triangle. As I started to hammer in a piton with one of my ice axes - the whole belay ripped out. It left me hanging only on the half way hammered in piton.

The sun was simply so intense that it melted out the ice screw and axes. After almost crashing down the mountain I decided to return due to the conditions. I felt much safer when I climbed Annapurna 8091m which is considered as one of the worlds most dangerous mountains. In the middle of the night I reached my camp1 at 6100m, ice screws had been melting out by the sun and ropes had been cut by heavy stone fall. I got hit several times and luckily did not get injured seriously. - what a day!

Back in basecamp the cook and his assistant prepared to leave the area but I just couldn’t let go until I felt that I had tried everything. So I decided to try an alternative route in my preferred style - light and fast soloing. I started of again at the 30.09.17 and left most of my equipment at the base of the mountain. I did to even take a light weight rope to be able to do rappels only having a harness in case of a helicopter rescue I started to ascent at 03.00 am when there where less avalanches. From my advanced basecamp at 5600m I went up and traversed to camp1 at 6400m from where I went up to camp2 at 6840m on the next day. From here I started at 10pm and climbed through the night reaching the ridge. The plateau on top let me struggling through almost waist deep powder to the summit which I reached on the 3rd of Oktober at 10.25am. Wind speeds of shortly up to 60kmh made my stay at this untouched place short though.

Reaching basecamp I found out that everybody left and his photographer Raphael Schardt was waiting in a single tent for his return.